Model G-Boy rev3 case files

Y2K

"The PS1 Guy"
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Do you have any kits left over?
Not to speak for Gman or anything, but hardly anyone has kits leftover, as most just built their G-Boys as soon as they got them lmfao
Your best bet is to part it out & build it yourself using the updated design linked above, since that's really the only way one could realistically build a G-Boy these days. It's a fun project. Otherwise not too many people still do commissions but, you'll maybe be able to find someone, not really too sure about that.
 
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Not to speak for Gman or anything, but hardly anyone has kits leftover, as most just built their G-Boys as soon as they got them lmfao
Your best bet is to part it out & build it yourself using the updated design linked above, since that's really the only way one could realistically build a G-Boy these days. It's a fun project. Otherwise not too many people still do commissions but, you'll maybe be able to find someone, not really too sure about that.
Would it be wise for me to do one (I'm a complete beginner) and would the battery LED take up more battery
 

Y2K

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Would it be wise for me to do one (I'm a complete beginner) and would the battery LED take up more battery
I'd advise you to tackle something easier as a beginner project. I usually recommend someone to learn how to solder first, as that is definitely a very importance skill to master.

Get yourself a good soldering iron (Pinecil comes highly recommended as a cheap but high quality option, can be found off AliExpress), and some learn-to-solder kits off Amazon or something. I'd say get one or two THT/throughhole soldering kits as those are easy for starting out, and then get some SMD kits, as that is probably more important of a skill to tackle for projects you'll find on these forums. They usually come with all the components you need to complete the kit and most of the time you get a fun end product that does something. They're usually not very expensive either. Some basic understanding of electronics also helps with troubleshooting, but not strictly required.

Once you're done with that, then a proper beginner project that is related to this community would be Nold's Wii Micro. For a portable, Ashida/G-Wii. The updated G-Boy is also somewhat beginner friendly but I'd say its a little more advanced since you'd have to order PCBs and everything.

To answer your question about a battery indicator LED, no, LEDs draw very little power in the grand scheme of the complete system's power draw. You won't notice any loss in battery life with one.

Hopefully that helps!
 
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I'd advise you to tackle something easier as a beginner project. I usually recommend someone to learn how to solder first, as that is definitely a very importance skill to master.

Get yourself a good soldering iron (Pinecil comes highly recommended as a cheap but high quality option, can be found off AliExpress), and some learn-to-solder kits off Amazon or something. I'd say get one or two THT/throughhole soldering kits as those are easy for starting out, and then get some SMD kits, as that is probably more important of a skill to tackle for projects you'll find on these forums. They usually come with all the components you need to complete the kit and most of the time you get a fun end product that does something. They're usually not very expensive either. Some basic understanding of electronics also helps with troubleshooting, but not strictly required.

Once you're done with that, then a proper beginner project that is related to this community would be Nold's Wii Micro. For a portable, Ashida/G-Wii. The updated G-Boy is also somewhat beginner friendly but I'd say its a little more advanced since you'd have to order PCBs and everything.

To answer your question about a battery indicator LED, no, LEDs draw very little power in the grand scheme of the complete system's power draw. You won't notice any loss in battery life with one.

Hopefully that helps!
It helps somewhat.
 
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I'd advise you to tackle something easier as a beginner project. I usually recommend someone to learn how to solder first, as that is definitely a very importance skill to master.

Get yourself a good soldering iron (Pinecil comes highly recommended as a cheap but high quality option, can be found off AliExpress), and some learn-to-solder kits off Amazon or something. I'd say get one or two THT/throughhole soldering kits as those are easy for starting out, and then get some SMD kits, as that is probably more important of a skill to tackle for projects you'll find on these forums. They usually come with all the components you need to complete the kit and most of the time you get a fun end product that does something. They're usually not very expensive either. Some basic understanding of electronics also helps with troubleshooting, but not strictly required.

Once you're done with that, then a proper beginner project that is related to this community would be Nold's Wii Micro. For a portable, Ashida/G-Wii. The updated G-Boy is also somewhat beginner friendly but I'd say its a little more advanced since you'd have to order PCBs and everything.

To answer your question about a battery indicator LED, no, LEDs draw very little power in the grand scheme of the complete system's power draw. You won't notice any loss in battery life with one.

Hopefully that helps!
I also already have soldering iron and soldering flux. (They're from the '80s and were my grandfather's)
 

Stitches

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By the way I have no money and I'm grounded and in school until 3:10 PM EST
Then please wait until you have several hundred dollars of disposable income to buy parts and modern tools. Building portable consoles is not cheap, and beginners often accidentally destroy expensive components the first time they work with them.
 
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Then please wait until you have several hundred dollars of disposable income to buy parts and modern tools. Building portable consoles is not cheap, and beginners often accidentally destroy expensive components the first time they work with them.
Well I have about $22.5 USD saved up
 

StonedEdge

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